#RPGaDay2015 Day 17, 18, 19: Favorite Fantasy, SF, and Supers RPG

Catching up on three-days worth of posts by writing about my favorite fantasy, sci-fi, and supers roleplaying games.

Rules_Cyclopedia_coverFavorite fantasy RPG, without a doubt, is Dungeons & Dragons. Let’s face it, without D&D, I would not be a gamer. This was my gateway drug, my first friend, my doorway into a whole new world of wonder. Yes, I may not play it right now, I may not have played it for a few years, I may not be thrilled about the current incarnation of the game, but at the end of the day, I still love D&D. My favorite iteration of the game was the collected Basic D&D rules in the Rules Cyclopedia, which is why I include the cover image to the right.

CyberpunkMy favorite sci-fi game is Cyberpunk 2020, which I already wrote about on Day 4. My sci-fi tastes tend to veer towards street-level glitzy future dystopia, and Cyberpunk delivers. Now, that said, for years I was totally enamored of Shadowrun as well, because it was D&D Cyberpunk, and sometimes that’s what you wanna play. And because I can’t make up my mind, my Sci-Fi Top 3 is completed by the very awesome Robotech RPG. I never cared too much for the system, but it was Robotech, and how could I not love transformable mecha?

conventioncomicsampleLastly, my favorite supers RPG is ICONS Superpowered Roleplaying. I’m not really into superhero RPGs, but this one hooked me right from the start. It uses a system that’s kind of a combination of the old Marvel Super Heroes RPG and Fate, featuring random character generation and quirky powers. It is easy to learn, easy to play, and lots of fun. I ran a game of ICONS at Gen Con a few years back where the player characters were con attendees given powers based around different types of games, and they had to battle the might of game creator Steve Kenson turned into the villainous RULES LAWYER! It was a blast.

#RPGaDay2015 Day 16: Longest Game Session Played

Rules_Cyclopedia_coverAlthough there were a few long nights playing Vampire at my apartment back in the late 90s, the gold medal for longest session played has to go to any of various weekend-long sessions of Dungeons and Dragons played during high school, back in the early 90s.

Back then, we would get together in one of two houses, five to six of us, loaded with snacks and drinks, and just start playing. We’d play and play and then play some more. At some point we’d fall asleep, then wake up, and keep playing. We’d do that from Friday evening until Sunday afternoon, or Monday afternoon if it was a long weekend. There were only a handful of marathon sessions like this, and each of them was absolutely epic.


During the month of August, I am participating in #RPGaDay, an opportunity to talk daily about different topics related to games and gaming, organized by Dave Chapman, designer of Doctor Who: Adventures In Time and Space. I’ve been out of gaming for a while, so this is gonna be an interesting exercise.

#RPGaDay2015 Day 15: Longest Campaign Played

The longest RPG campaign I’ve played in is The Ballad of Hal Whitewyrm.

ballad-header

Back in 2011, I wrote a post titled The One Character That Got Away, in which I spoke about Hal Whitewyrm, a player character I always wanted to play but never had a chance to. At the prompting of my friend Judd Karlman, I spoke about Hal, and what kind of game I would want to play if I had the chance. I wrote,

“I’d play the character I’ve carried with me for years, Hal Whitewyrm, a half-elven bard with weredragon blood in his ancestry (weredragons are a race of female-only shapeshifting wyrms from the Moonshaes – see the thread there?). He’s the guy I wrote stories about in my teens yet never got to play. Hal is all about the romantic journey (as in literary genre, not mass market Harlequin titles), facing adventure in a large world, ideally of the legendary danger kind, with fast friends at his side, a love life to look forward to, and death around him to put it all in perspective. Think Aragorn’s journey, but with a bard who also deals with issues of identity.”

Next thing I know, Judd had made a campaign at Obsidian Portal and we started to play a Burning Wheel game set in the Forgotten Realms. In tune with the ideas we spoke about the type of game we would play, we named the campaign The Ballad of Hal Whitewyrm, both a reference to Hal being a bard, and to the medieval ballads from which we would take inspiration. This would be a play-by-post game, and we were jumping-in-place excited.

We played that game for 3 years, from 2011 through 2014. It was lightning in a bottle. The first few months alone we were on fire, practically playing dueling keyboards. Our posts were fast and furious, a rat-tat-tat of high adventure gaming. I would be at work, back when I was at the university bookstore, writing posts in my crappy semi-smartphone in between cashing out college students buying sodas and microwave burritos. Judd would reply as fast as he could while he juggled school and work and his other extracurricular activities. It honestly was gaming magic. And like magic, with time, it vanished. Time passed, life happened, and although we both loved the world we had created together, we let it languish. I’ll always see it as my fault.

See that description I quoted above? Judd was spot-on in bringing those themes out to play in our game. As I wrote in my original post, Hal was me, my avatar. And as much as I tried to see it as only a game, at times it affected me personally. Hal’s journey in many ways paralleled my own. It was uncanny, because Judd did not know anything of what was going on in my private life, yet his insight into the game, his ability to hone in on the themes important to Hal, this meant that more often than not, Judd was pushing buttons without knowing. And at one point, I had to tap the mat. I had to concede. It was gaming magic.

We played in fits and starts after that, fueled by the love we had for this game. We refused to let it go, but it happened. My life changed a lot over 2012-13, and Hal went on living his life in the Realms, just without us there to see his adventures.

In terms of actual time spent playing, this isn’t the longest campaign I’ve played in; that title actually goes to the Vampire: The Masquerade Miami By Night chronicle I ran at home for almost 3 years of weekly-ish sessions. But The Ballad of Hal Whitewyrm feels like the longest campaign I’ve played in because of the emotional connection I have to it. Each post I wrote describing Hal’s life in the Realms felt as if I was truly there, seeing through his eyes. We experienced the world together. We shared a life. If you have seen the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode The Inner Light, where Picard experiences 40 years in the life of a man in what are a few minutes in real-time, then know that is how I felt every time I played Hal Whitewyrm.

It was gaming magic. And magic lives forever.


During the month of August, I am participating in #RPGaDay, an opportunity to talk daily about different topics related to games and gaming, organized by Dave Chapman, designer of Doctor Who: Adventures In Time and Space. I’ve been out of gaming for a while, so this is gonna be an interesting exercise.

#RPGaDay2015 Day 14: Favorite RPG Accessory

Forgotten Realms AtlasThe Forgotten Realms Atlas was this gorgeous book published in 1990 by TSR that was part map archive, part chronicle of the novels published up to that point, part travelogue across Faerun. Printed in black and sepia, it had an air of antiquity to it that made it seem like a found artifact rather than a book purchased at the store.

I spent long hours reading it, studying the maps, learning the history of the Realms. I poured over it cover to cover more times than I could ever count, and never got tired of it. Every time I see it on my bookshelf, every time I pick it up for some random reason, it takes me back to a simpler time when I felt right at home in the lands of Faerun. It remains to this day one of my absolute favorite books, gaming or otherwise, and certainly right in the top 3 of my Forgotten Realms Hall of Fame.

The page for the PDF version of the Atlas at DriveThruRPG.com has a product history by Shannon Applecline that is both short and interesting, if you’d like to know more.


During the month of August, I am participating in #RPGaDay, an opportunity to talk daily about different topics related to games and gaming, organized by Dave Chapman, designer of Doctor Who: Adventures In Time and Space. I’ve been out of gaming for a while, so this is gonna be an interesting exercise.